TVR Institute Courses

 

Course curriculum has been approved by the NWIC Curriculum Committee, and each class can be taken for college credit or for CEU credit. Classes are delivered online at set times each week, and can also be accessed by phone. Participants can access audio and video recordings of classes following class meetings. Every effort will be made to provide coursework access to students with disabilities as well as those with limited internet connectivity and hardware/software issues. Upon completion of all seven (7) courses for credit, an Award of Completion will be granted to the participant on behalf of Northwest Indian College.

TVRS 301: Tribal Voc. Rehab. Foundations: History

(3 credits)

$112 per credit (for credit, resident tuition)

$309 per credit (for credit, non-resident tuition)

$25 flat fee (CEU, non-credit)

Course Description 

Provides an overview of Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation (TVR), including the history, the relationship between state vocational rehabilitation agencies and TVR agencies, and the role of TVR counselors in partnering with and serving individuals with disabilities.  Introduces various types of disabilities and methods for testing functionalities related to independence and levels of employability.

Course Outcomes 

Upon the successful completion of this course, each student will be able to:

  1. Describe points of history for VR and TVR;
  2. Describe the relationship between the State VR agencies and the TVR program;
  3. Describe three concepts required in a written agreement between State and Tribal VR;
  4. Analyze differences between a “qualified VR counselor” and an essential TVR counselor;
  5. Describe the sole authorities of the TVR counselor;
  6. List characteristics used to determine whether a VR applicant/client meets the definition of having a significant disability;
  7. Describe three appellate rights of  VR consumers;
  8. List the roles of consumers in the VR process;
  9. Describe the issues VR needs to address in preparing a client for employment.

TVRS 302: Tribal Voc. Rehab. Foundations: Communication

(3 credits)

$112 per credit (for credit, resident tuition)

$309 per credit (for credit, non-resident tuition)

$25 flat fee (CEU, non-credit)

Course Description 

Introduces the vocational rehabilitation program as an investment in people and how Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation (TVR) staff must communicate in ways that show respect at all points in the process, including communicating applicant and client rights, eligibility determination, informed choice, and confidentiality. Includes an overview of strategies for communicating with the TVR agency’s governing body.  

Course Outcomes 

Upon the successful completion of this course, each student will be able to:

  1. Define why an application form for VR should be a comprehensive document;
  2. Describe the key purposes for an intake interview as well as the kind of information that should not be included;
  3. Describe or characterize motivational interviewing and its use within the VR process;
  4. Identify the points in the VR process when a client should be notified of their rights and responsibilities; 
  5. Define the purpose and value of “informed choice” in the VR process;
  6. Describe the effectiveness and practice of confidentiality policies in your TVR agency;
  7. Describe the options an applicant or participant has in selecting the administrative review process;
  8. Describe the key roles the Governing Body (e.g., Tribal Council) has related to the VR grant;
  9. List the essential partnerships your TVR agency has within your community.

TVRS 303: Tribal Voc. Rehab. Foundations: Assess/Eligibility

(3 credits)

$112 per credit (for credit, resident tuition)

$309 per credit (for credit, non-resident tuition)

$25 flat fee (CEU, non-credit)

Course Description 

Provides an overview of the process of gathering essential information to determine Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation (TVR) eligibility, including confidentiality guidelines, factors used in determining eligibility, the six essential eligibility criteria, the closure procedures for those not meeting eligibility, and the transition between eligibility and the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE).

Course Outcomes 

Upon the successful completion of this course, each student will be able to:

  1. Identify several sources for gathering information essential for determining eligibility;
  2. Describe methods to use to gather additional detail needed for eligibility;
  3. Describe how to verify where the person lives for the residency requirement;
  4. Describe three (3) types of disability impairments and the licensed medical/psychological/treatment provider needed to assess the reported impairments; 
  5. Describe the methods to use to determine if the impairments would provide substantial impediments to employment;
  6. Identify the factors and issues to consider when determining if a client can benefit from VR services in terms of achieving an employment outcome;
  7. Describe why a person who met all other eligibility criteria would not meet the criteria of requiring VR services;
  8. List the options a client has for getting help in drafting their IPE.

TVRS 304: Tribal Voc. Rehab. Foundations: IPE Development

(3 credits)

$112 per credit (for credit, resident tuition)

$309 per credit (for credit, non-resident tuition)

$25 flat fee (CEU, non-credit)

Course Description 

Presents the process for the qualified individual to develop an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE), including informed choice, methods for establishing the targeted employment outcome, and using amendments. Introduces strategies for case management, including a grid for planning and tracking services and a database for information for annual reporting.           

Course Outcomes 

Upon the successful completion of this course, each student will be able to:

  1. Identify the required elements of the IPE; 
  2. Identify the definitions of appropriate VR employment outcomes;
  3. Describe how to determine the need and purpose for up-front assistive services;
  4. Describe the types of services that a VRC could not provide with agency funds before fully considering the availability of comparable services and benefits;
  5. Identify the six (6) “exempt” services that do not require full consideration for comparable services and benefits;
  6. Describe the procedure for providing traditional healing or other culturally-appropriate services;
  7. Describe why “terms and conditions” are required elements of the IPE;
  8. Describe the types of entities that require a list of responsibilities related to the IPE;
  9. Describe how to measure a client’s progress in the IPE towards employment;
  10. Describe the conditions and characteristics of post-employment services.

TVRS 305: Tribal Voc. Rehab. Foundations: Case Record and Management

(3 credits)

$112 per credit (for credit, resident tuition)

$309 per credit (for credit, non-resident tuition)

$25 flat fee (CEU, non-credit)

Course Description 

Presents the requirements for case record documentation, case records retention, and effective ways to organize case records. Introduces the concept and importance of the team approach in agencies to ensure that client needs are addressed and that case organization and team management produces higher-quality client employment outcomes.      

Course Outcomes 

Upon the successful completion of this course, each student will be able to:

  1. List the required contents of a case record;
  2. Describe the follow-up on a case that is determined “incapable of benefiting”;
  3. Describe the follow-up on a case that closed due to severity of disability;
  4. List the criteria required to close a case where an employment outcome is successfully achieved;
  5. Describe why it is important to have a single case record format for a TVR agency;
  6. Describe your agency’s strategy for ensuring that case records meet agency and legal standards, including confidentiality;
  7. Describe the agency’s methods for gathering and reporting the case record data to RSA;
  8. Describe your agency’s methods for ensuring client services are deliverable and follow the design of the case record when the assigned VRC is absent;
  9. Describe how a counselor would prioritize caseload duties such as progress notes, paperwork and client contacts.
  10. Describe the legal requirements for retaining closed case records.

TVRS 306: Tribal Voc. Rehab. Foundations: Job Search and Employment

(3 credits)

$112 per credit (for credit, resident tuition)

$309 per credit (for credit, non-resident tuition)

$25 flat fee (CEU, non-credit)

Course Description 

Presents the definition of employment used in vocational rehabilitation. Introduces concepts such as trial work experiences, the role of employers, the use of Community Rehabilitation Programs in work-related assessments and focused training, and post-employment services. Provides an overview of approaches and techniques for job-seeking skills, including using online employment resources.   

Course Outcomes 

Upon the successful completion of this course, each student will be able to:

  1. Describe how rehabilitation, culture, and employment are linked in TVR;
  2. Describe the relationship between eligibility determination and employment options;
  3. Describe the purposes of a trial work plan for an individual with a significant disability;
  4. Describe the expectations of an employer when using real work settings; 
  5. Describe the situation when it is necessary to discuss reasonable accommodations and assistive technology with an employer;
  6. Identify when it is necessary to consider supporting a client interested in self-employment;
  7. Describe the pros and cons of using CRPs for client vocational assessment;
  8. Describe when it is time to assist the client in preparing a job resume;
  9. Summarize the requirements for providing post-employment services.

TVRS 307: Tribal Voc. Rehab. Foundations: Resource Management

(3 credits)

$112 per credit (for credit, resident tuition)

$309 per credit (for credit, non-resident tuition)

$25 flat fee (CEU, non-credit)

Course Description 

Presents the tribal vocational rehabilitation (TVR) agency management system from a counselor perspective, including planning and using a budget, collecting caseload data, and performance reporting. Also covers building partnerships with other Tribal departments, local agencies, and employers to provide holistic services and to diversify client service funding sources.

Course Outcomes 

Upon the successful completion of this course, each student will be able to:

  1. Describe methods used to establish a positive understanding of TVR in tribal service communities;
  2. Identify (in a funded TVR proposal) the described resources that require a management system;
  3. Describe the management system used by your TVR agency that tracks and reports grant expenditures, draw downs, match and indirect costs;
  4. Describe a TVR agency management system essential to provide and maintain case records;
  5. Identify the contents of a TVR cuff account (refer in part to ED 524A&B);
  6. Describe the gathering of TVR annual performance data required for RSA reporting;
  7. Describe key elements in building and maintaining an effective team in a TVR agency.
  8. Define effective ways of building and maintaining positive organizational awareness in the TVR program and the greater community;
  9. Identify methods used to develop and maintain an effective relationship with the agency’s Governing Body.